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The nice thing about traveling for work is that you can hop in a taxi without worrying about the cost since, after all, you're not picking up the tab. The downside of that privilege is that, about a week or two after that, you'll have to sit down and tediously justify your expenditure to your boss. That's not a problem, however, if your company has signed up with Uber for Business, which sends the bills straight to the firm instead of piling on your own credit card. Until now, however, that service was only available in the US and Canada, with a few trials taking place in the UK and France. As you might have guessed from the headline, today's the day that the company opens up Uber for Business to all of the 45 countries in which it operates. Now all we have to do is work out if we can pretend that our hand slipped and we hit the Uber Lux button by mistake.

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Garmin Forerunner 920XT

Garmin's GPS watch lineup has had an imbalance as of late; while more modest athletes have had luxuries like color displays and phone integration, you've had to make do with monochrome and old-school PC syncing if you need multi-sport wristwear like the Forerunner 910XT. Thankfully, you won't have to make that sacrifice any more now that the company has launched a much-needed follow-up -- not surprisingly, the Forerunner 920XT. The new watch tracks your biking, running and swimming stats like its ancestor, but catches up on 2014-era tech through a color screen, phone support (including call and message notifications) and advanced data like your running gait and oxygen volume estimates. It should be lighter, thinner and more comfortable than the 910XT, too, so you won't notice it quite so much while you're in the middle of a practice session. Just be ready to pay up if you want Garmin's most capable wearable. The 920XT starts at $450 ($50 more than the 910XT) all by itself, and you're looking at $500 if you want a heart rate monitor at the same time.

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The problem with owning the rights to Twilight is that the story eventually ends, meaning that there's no more massively profitable movies with glitter guy, mumbling girl and the shirtless one with all the teeth. It's a problem that Lionsgate knows all too well, which is why it's hoping to prolong the saga by producing a series of five short movies based on a "broad spectrum of characters" from the Twilight universe. Unlike other digital video properties that have chosen Netflix or Amazon Instant Video for distribution, Lionsgate is going with a website that better caters to the shrieking tween market: Facebook.

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Unsurprisingly, there's one group that's not at all excited to hear Netflix and IMAX are arranging for the Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon sequel to hit theaters and streaming at the same time: movie theater owners. According to the LA Times, Regal, AMC, Carmike and Cinemark have all stated they don't plan to screen Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Legend on their IMAX screens when it arrives next year, while Variety notes Canada's Cineplex and Europe's Cineworld are also staying away from the flick. The studios blocked a planned experiment to sell Tower Heist viewing for $60 a pop (honestly, they saved everyone there) back in 2011, but it seems doubtful they'll be able to intimidate Netflix into backing down.

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Apple has released a new version of its Apple Watch design video, and a perceptive viewer noticed a slightly different design from the original. Most noticeable is a smaller sapphire screen and larger bezel on the Watch render, which appears to more closely match the prototype hardware we saw last month. None of this too surprising -- Apple had no doubt prepared the video using 3D renders before the final design was locked, and the changes are small enough that most folks won't care. Still, it does make us wonder if there may be more fine-tuning before production starts in January, especially given rumors of battery-life issues.

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Remember that Pokémon iPad game that was teased not too long ago? Well, if the mere mention of it stoked a fire inside that made you want to abandon Blizzard's Hearthstone forever, Joystiq has spotted that the pocket monster trading card game is available on the App Store now. Pokémon TCG Online is free to download, but there are a few catches. As the name suggests, it requires an internet connection to play and your Apple-branded slate needs to be of the Retina-display variety -- your first- and second-gen iPads won't cut the mustard, according to iTunes. If you're already heavily invested in the game on OSX and Windows, Time points out that progress you've made in the last three years transfers over to the mobile version as well. Handy! And just like that, a Nintendo property is appearing somewhere other than on one of its own devices. Somewhere, an investor is probably smiling.

[Image Credit: Josh Wittenkeller]

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A fleet of 737s and 777s are definitely in line for an upgrade, now that the Federal Aviation Administration has ordered airlines to replace their cockpits' displays with ones not vulnerable to WiFi signals. Let's go back a few years to understand what's going on here. See, back when the use of wireless internet aboard airplanes was only just starting to take off, Boeing conducted a test, which discovered that WiFi signals affected 737 and 777 cockpit displays. These screens, which showed pilots important flight data such as altitude and airspeed, flickered and even blanked out completely in the presence of WiFi. In one particular bad test run, the screen remained blank for a full six minutes.

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There's no way you'd use a shock collar to train your beloved dog, but you wouldn't mind using one on yourself if it means breaking your nastiest habits, eh? If that's the case, then your day has come: Pavlok (a wearable band that can zap you with electricity) is now up on Indiegogo, with its designer hoping to raise $50,000 to develop more features and to begin mass production. In order to train yourself to stay away from bad habits or continue doing good ones, you'll need to program the Pavlok app -- for instance, you can instruct it to zap you awake if you hit snooze twice on your alarm. The good news is that you can set the electricity the wristband zaps you with from 17 to 340 volts, so you can adjust it accordingly and make sure each it's not strong enough to actually hurt.

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The nice thing about living in Apple's ecosystem is everything is consistent: the app library, the user interface and design motifs echo across all of the company's devices. Well, unless you have a gold iPhone -- then any iPad you could possibly buy just simply wouldn't match. According to Bloomberg, however, those days might be over: the usual people familiar with Apple's plans say that the company will launch a 9.7-inch iPad next month with a gold backplate. You know, in case your buying habits are governed more by fashion than new features.

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