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Philae's fate remains unknown as it snoozes underneath a cliff on comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. But in the last few days, its ground crew has released a handful of updates that give us a better idea of what it's gone through since it left Rosetta for the comet, as well as of its current state. To start with, the team has released a 3D image of the comet's surface (seen after the break) from two miles above the ground, captured one hour before the intrepid lander was supposed touch down. Philae took the two photos of the original landing site two minutes apart using the Rosetta Lander Imaging System (ROLIS).

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Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology and more in print and on the web. Some weeks, you'll also find short reviews of books that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read.

The National Security Agency (NSA) headq

@War: The Rise of the Military-Internet Complex
by Shane Harris

The NSA's surveillance tactics have been discussed at length, and will continue to be as new information comes to light. In a recent book, author Shane Harris details Silicon Valley's involvement with the government's watch, including how some companies are disclosing security flaws to US agencies before they're alerting customers. Harris also covers details like how network traffic is shared and how backdoors are intentionally left open for the authorities' prying eyes. Want to read on? You can dive in with an excerpt from the title over at Salon.

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Even with the amount of electric vehicles we've seen lately, it's likely going to be a long time until they completely replace traditional combustion engines on the road. So how are we going to get away from pricey fossil fuels until then? Well, water could be a possibility. German company Sunfire GmbH thinks it has the solution for turning H20 and carbon dioxide into liquid hyrdrocarbons like synthetic diesel, kerosene and petrol, according to CNET. It does this in part by using a combination of the Fischer-Tropsch process (a chemical reaction that performs the aforementioned transformation) and solid electrolyzer cells (fuel cells that produce gas forms of hydrogen and oxygen).

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After a few months of testing, the feature that allows Chrome OS users to stream videos from Google Drive storage -- like the free 1TB allotted to new owners -- to a Chromecast is now available to (almost) everyone. An update on the stable channel this week pushed it to most people, with the exception of a few devices: the Dell Chromebook 11, HP Chromebook 14, Acer C720 and the Toshiba Chromebook. One thing everyone with the Chromecast dongle can appreciate are additional backgrounds, this time provided by NASA. To access them, pop open the Chromecast app on your mobile device, select "Backdrop", go to settings and choose NASA.

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What a long, strange trip it's been. Microsoft's effort to document the excavation of all those fabled E.T. The Extraterrestrial game cartridges from a New Mexico landfill -- and Atari's downfall -- is finally watchable on Xbox Video. As Variety reports, you can check out Atari: Game Over on your Xbox One, Xbox 360 or even on the web and see where those carts came from before they hit eBay. Perhaps most notable is that it's one of Xbox Entertainment Studios' scant few projects to actually see the light of day, getting a release a few months removed from Redmond shuttering its original-TV-programming experiment. So there's that, too. Need a refresher on Atari's Spielberg-infused saga before turning on your flatscreen? We've got you covered.

[Image credit: John Thien for Engadget]

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Anti-job cut protest in Madrid

Governments aren't usually quick to react to changes in demographics. They frequently have to take surveys that are not only slow, but don't always paint a complete picture of what's going on. Researchers at the Autonomous University of Madrid have discovered a far more effective way of keeping tabs on the population, however: tracking Twitter updates. They've found that the content, frequency and timing of tweets across Spain correlate well with joblessness levels in their respective regions. People in high unemployment areas tend to not only mention jobs more often in their posts, but tweet more in the morning and make a larger number of spelling mistakes. Since it's both easy and quick to collect that information, it's possible to track economic patterns almost as they happen -- you can see when a financial crisis hits a city hard, or when there's a job boom.

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Google's been wrestling with the European Union over antitrust issues for a long while now. Today, though, Parliament says it's come up with a possible solution: severing search from the rest of Google. Read on for the rest of our news highlights from the last 24 hours, including the Fire HD 6, Amazon's rumored video-streaming service and an interactive map of public defecation.

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2014 NBC Upfront Presentation

Last year, NBC announced it would be home to a new show written and produced by Tina Fey (30 Rock, SNL) and starring Ellie Kemper (The Office), but now that show's going straight to Netflix. Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt will premiere across all of Netflix's territories in March with its 13-episode first season, and Netflix has already signed it up for a second. According to NBC exec Rob Greenblatt, the move is a result of the network's "very drama-heavy mid-season schedule", and he calls Netflix's two-season pickup an "instant win-win for everyone." Coincidentally, it comes days after Hulu announced it ordered the series Difficult People, produced by Amy Poehler. The comedy series is about a woman who starts over in New York after leaving the cult where she's lived for the last 15 years, armed with "a backpack, light-up sneakers, and a couple of way-past-due library books." In case 30 Rock fans needed any more reason to tune in, Jane Krakowski and Titus Burgess will be appearing as well. That should help fill the gap until Judd Apatow's Love in 2016, and will arrive around the same time as Netflix's new drama series Bloodline.

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The Hamptons Lure Uber Top Drivers Amid NYC Slow Summer Weekends

Uber is not having a good week. Between surreptitiously tracking journalists' trips inside 'God View' and an executive implying the company should dig up dirt on reporters critical of the service, the company has been on a pretty bumpy road. However, they're still one of the most popular ride sharing services. Does the company's seemingly callous disregard for customer privacy change whether you still use its app? Head over to the Engadget forums and share your thoughts on ridesharing.

[Image credit: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images]

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Earlier this month, Google Maps for Android received the requisite Material Design update and tacked on in-app restaurant reservations for good measure (in the US). A new version is rolling out, and with it comes some handy features to lend a hand with those navigation needs. The app will display time, weather and a smattering of facts about your destination in addition to letting you know exactly how much time that alternate route will save. In addition, Maps can show or hide traffic with a simple voice command, should you need to sort the info without futzing with that handset. Version 9.1 should hit your devices soon, but if you can't wait, the folks over at Android Police have the APK available for manual install.

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